Effective Clinical Interventions with Low-nurturance Families

Help clients improve their balances

By Peter K. Gerlach, MSW
Member NSRC Experts Council

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The Web address of this article is http://sfhelp.org/pro/rx/support_rx.htm

        Clicking links here will open a new window or an informational popup, so turn off your browser's popup blocker or accept popups from this nonprofit, ad-free site . If the windows distract you, read the article before following any links.

        This article is one of a series on effective professional counseling, coaching, and therapy with (a) low-nurturance (dysfunctional) families and with (b) typical survivors of childhood neglect and trauma. These articles for professionals are under construction.

        This series assumes you're familiar with:

        Before continuing, pause and reflect - why are you reading this article? What do you need?

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       This article is one of a series on effective clinical interventions with low-nurturance family clients. A "low nurturance family" is one in which members seldom get their primary needs met in wholistically-healthy ways. An effective intervention is an instinctive or intentional behavior of the clinician which significantly raises the family's nurturance level in the opinion of all involved.

        To get the most from this article, first read:

  • this introduction to professional family clinicians and educators,

  • this slide presentation on the [wounds + unawareness] cycle that is a root stressor with typical low-nurturance families (best viewed with Internet Explorer or Netscape browsers)..

  • this overview of the clinical model on which these articles are based;

  • this summary of requisites for effective professional service with these clients;

  • scan these terms which are liberally used throughout these clinical articles;

  • this overview of effective clinical assessment of these six types  of client families; and...

  • this introduction to effective interventions with low-nurturance families and individuals recovering from psychological wounds.

Perspective

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Updated April 30, 2013